Auto Collison teacher delivers trailer load of commodities to Oklahoma toronado victims

Duncanville+High+School+Auto+Body+teacher+Jason+Tyer+stands+at+the+nose+of+his+transport+trailer+prior+to+delivering+a+full+load+of+commodities+to+victims+of+the+Oklahoma+toronado+victims.+%28submitted+photo%29

Duncanville High School Auto Body teacher Jason Tyer stands at the nose of his transport trailer prior to delivering a full load of commodities to victims of the Oklahoma toronado victims. (submitted photo)

Duncanville High School Auto Body teacher Jason Tyer stands at the nose of his transport trailer prior to delivering a full load of commodities to victims of the Oklahoma toronado victims. (submitted photo)
After hearing about the tornadoes and the victims in Moore, Oklahoma, Auto Collision teacher Jason Tyer and others in his program at the high school conducted a donation drive and transported all of the collected supplies to the area May 25.

“When I started out, I was just going to do something small. Then I started asking a couple of people and the next thing I knew, it just kind of grew into this big donation and we just ran with it,” Tyer said.

Holding the drive, Tyer says he was able to fill a trailer full of supplies ranging from water bottles to personal toiletries that were collected by Duncanville High School and the community.

“We collected tons of clothing, shoes, children toys, backpacks, over 1300 bottles of water, toilet paper, toiletries, and other bathroom items,” Tyer said. “Just about anything they needed to take care of themselves [we collected], not necessarily their household, but them personally.”

Once everything was gathered, Tyer loaded his trailer with the help of a few friends and headed to Oklahoma. When he got there, he says the sights that he was welcomed to were very shocking.

“I was surprised,” Tyer said. “You know you see pictures of it, but once you get there, it’s just so much more realistic. When you see pictures of it destroyed, it’s one thing, but when you actually see it and you take a glance around, everything is completely destroyed and everyone is living in tents and things like that.”

Although seeing everything firsthand was a shock for the teacher, he says the whole experience meant a lot to him and he would do it again if he needed to.

“I’ve never really been one much on doing things like this before, but it felt pretty good to help these people,” Tyer said. ”

Auto Body teacher Jason Tyer's garage was packed with items to deliver to the Oklahoma victims.