Students get up close look at sharks during dissection project

Students+get+up+close+look+at+sharks+during+dissection+project

Seniors Daniela Najera and Jennifer Howland react to the removal of a shark from their bag during a classroom dissection lab in aquatic science. (Damian McElwee II photo)
Seniors Daniela Najera and Jennifer Howland react to the removal of a shark from their bag during a classroom dissection lab in aquatic science. (Damian McElwee II photo)

Aquatic Science is getting busy this week dissecting sharks, and no, not the Super Bowl halftime shark, an actual shark. Ms. Holloway’s class blocks began their dissections on dogfish sharks and surprisingly, were very excited for the project.

    “I’m not grossed out as some people seem to be,” senior, Dulce Benavides says. “I’m actually hoping we find a babies in our shark.”

    As the the 4th block class was getting ready to begin their dissection Ms. Holloway explained the objective of the experiment to the students.

    “We are dissecting sharks because their structure is very similar to our structure, something different, though, is that sharks have gills because they are fish, most people don’t know that they’re fish, but they are,” Holloway said.

    The shark dissection began after the brief instruction and a short video. The project began with a shout from the other end of the room by a group os students who were surprised by what they found.

    “WE FOUND BABY SHARKS,” a group of students said.

    The class seemed to shift into the finding baby sharks mindset after that because most of  the groups began finding the babies in the belly of their shark. The total at the end was about 20 baby sharks, with the same group that found the first one, finding 5 more. And then the chaos continued as one group found a undigested fish in the stomach of their shark.

    “We found a fish. That was pretty exciting, a whole fish that we had to cut to get out of the stomach,” senior, Juan Contreras says. “It was almost as the big as the shark, I don’t even know how it ate that.”

    Overall, the class seemed to be intrigued and fully enjoy the project. It was an entertaining experience to see the disgusted expressions and focused students that were actually wanting to open a shark.

    “I really wanted to see the inside of a shark, and knowing that they had a similar structure to ours made it more interesting,” junior, Marcus Spearman says. “I think we all got what we wanted today, whether it was finding babies or just seeing the anatomy of a shark, it was awesome.”